Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Welcome to the 2019-20 Robinson Wellness E-News! 

You can check here for all school health and wellness committee activities, 
announcements and updates!    ~Christie Camizzi, BSN, RN



Contents:

1. Does Fitness and Body Weight in Adolescents Predict Later-Life Disability?
2. Sugary Drinks and the Rise of Metabolic Syndrome
3. Germ Control
4. Staying Home During Illness


************New & Events***********

Does Fitness and Body Weight in Adolescents Predict 

Later-Life Disability?

Posted in
Thursday, Sep 12, 2019

Can too much fat and too little fitness in teens lead to disability down the road?

It’s no secret that the combination of obesity and a sedentary lifestyle are wreaking havoc on our health. Americans of all ages from childhood to adulthood are suffering because of a lack of physical activity and poor nutrition. 
For kids and teens, the problem has long-reaching effects. Adolescents already get inadequate amounts of physical activity from too much screen time (i.e. social media, video games, and binge-watching TV), driving everywhere, and optional or non-existent P.E. classes in schools. Add to that a never-ending exposure to fast food and it is no wonder why obesity rates among young people are at an all-time high.



This current situation gives rise to an interesting and important question:

Does fitness and body weight status during adolescence have any association with the risk of disability later in life? 

A recent study reported results on over 1 million Swedish male adolescents between the ages of 16 and 19, who were conscripted into the military between 1972 and 1994. Researchers measured their body mass index (BMI)* and cardiorespiratory fitness level (CRF)* at baseline and followed up an average of 28 years later to see if they were receiving disability pensions. 

The results were as follows:

  • Adolescents in the bottom 10% of fitness were four times more likely to be on disability later in life than those in the top 10% of fitness. 
  • Those with a BMI greater than 35 were 2.5 times more likely to receive a disability pension later in life when compared to a “normal” BMI (18.5-24.9 kg/m2).
  • Within each of the six BMI categories, those who were in the High fitness group were substantially less likely to receive a disability pension later in life compared to those who were Low fitness group.
The results indicate that the BMI and CRF status of male adolescents is strongly associated with their future risk of disability. The results also support the position of the American Heart Association that CRF should be considered a clinical vital sign.

The study highlights what we already know - we must prioritize fitness and physical activity to improve the health of our children. The cost of their health comes at great cost to us all.  

*BMI was categorized as:

  • Underweight (<18.5 kg/m2)
  • Normal Weight (18.5 - 24.9 kg/m2)
  • Overweight (25 - 29.9 kg/m2)
  • Class 1 Obese (30 - 34.9 kg/m2)
  • Class 2 Obese (35 - 39.9 kg/m2)
  • Class 3 Obese (>40 kg/m2)
*CRF was classified as:
  • Low (bottom 20%)
  • Moderate (20 - 80%)
  • High (top 20%)  

Reference

Henriksson, P., Henriksson, H., Tynelius, P., Beglind, D., Lof, M., Lee, IM, Shiroma, E., Ortega, F. (2019). Fitness and Body Mass Index during Adolescence and Disability Later in Life. Annals of Internal Medicine, doi:10.7326/M18-1861.

Taken from the Cooper Institute

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Sugary drinks and the rise of metabolic syndrome
Are sugary drinks to blame for metabolic syndrome?


Are sugary drinks to blame for the rise of metabolic syndrome in children? It’s common knowledge to not let your children snack on candy all day, but many parents forget to consider that the most common culprit of hidden sugar is those sugary drinks.
Despite our best efforts, childhood obesity rates continue to rise due to lack of physical activity and poor nutrition. Obesity usually brings on a host of corresponding health-related problems, such as type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The onset of these two conditions among children has increased significantly over the last two decades and sugar-loaded drinks such as sodas, sports drinks and fruit-flavored beverages* may be largely to blame.

The Risks of Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome among children is a global health concern that will likely persist into adulthood if neglected. Specifically, metabolic syndrome is the presence of a cluster of risk factors, such as:
  • insulin resistance (body’s inability to regulate blood sugar)
  • high blood pressure
  • obesity
  • low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (also known as the “good” cholesterol)
  • increased triglycerides (free fatty acids in the blood).
The presence of metabolic syndrome greatly increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and kidney disease. While genetics may be partially to blame, often times the problem stems from environmental and lifestyle factors.

The Impact of Sugary Drinks and Fitness

Are sugary drinks to blame for the rise of metabolic syndrome?

In a study from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), researchers examined lifestyle factors such as the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and physical activity levels to see how it affected the risk of metabolic syndrome in adolescents.
The results showed that increased intake of sugary drinks clearly had a negative impact, including:
  • ↑ increased insulin resistance (indicating that the body is having trouble regulating blood sugar)
  • ↑ increased systolic blood pressure (top number of the blood pressure reading)
  • ↑ increased waist circumference
  • ↑ increased body mass index (BMI)
  • ↓ reduced “good” HDL cholesterol
Alternatively, higher levels of physical activity clearly lead to overall improvements, such as:
  • ↓ increased insulin resistance
  • ↓ increased LDL cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein, aka “bad” cholesterol)
  • ↓ reduced triglycerides (free fatty acids in the blood)
  • ↑ increased “good” HDL cholesterol
The positive benefits were even more profound when high physical activity levels were combined with a reduced intake of sugar-sweetened drinks. The findings clearly indicate that to prevent metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents, we must increase their physical activity levels while reducing their sugar consumption.

What Can We Do?

The study is just another stone in the pillar of truth about childhood obesity. If we want our children to be healthy, we have to make sure they get enough physical activity and follow a healthy diet. Children and adolescents should get at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day, according to the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. We must also limit their intake of sugar-loaded drinks while making sure they get enough water to stay hydrated. Helping kids get active and get healthy is the key to reducing metabolic syndrome so they can live Well. Into the Future.
*100% fruit juice is not considered a sugar-sweetened beverage because it does not contain added sugar and is recognized by the American Dietary Guidelines and the American Academy of Pediatrics as a healthy alternative source of fruit.  However, servings should be limited to 4 to 6 ounces per day for young children and 8 to 12 ounces per day for children 7 and up.

Reference:

Bremer, A.A., Auinger, P., & Byrd, R.S., (2009). Relationship between insulin-resistance-associated metabolic parameters and anthropometric measurement with sugar-sweetened beverage intake and physical activity levels in US adolescents. JAMA: Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, 163(4), 328 – 335.

Written by Andjelka Pavlovic, PhD


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Germ Control

Happy Fall, Razorbacks!  Just a reminder that it is a great idea to have your child immunized against the flu virus. Once simple vaccine goes a long way to help keep your child healthy throughout the fall and winter months.  Also, remind your child at home to wash hands frequently and I will also reinforce those habits here at school.  We can't keep all illness away from school but we can all do our part to minimize the impact germs make on our student population as a whole. 




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Staying Home During Illness

I know that students and parents feel a lot of pressure to keep their kids at school due to class demands and work schedules; however, remember the Plano ISD policies about keeping your student at home.  Following these guidelines protects ALL staff and students.  This includes:

a)Temperature of 100 ° or more. Student must be fever free for 24 hours, without medication, before re-entry
b) Pain and/or swelling at angle of jaw
c) Undetermined rash over any part of the body
d) Undiagnosed scaly patches on the body or scalp
e) Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. Student must be symptom free for 24 hours, without medication, before re-entry
f) Red, draining eyes
g) Intense itching with signs and symptoms of secondary infection
h) Open draining lesions that cannot be covered and contained
i) Jaundice
j) Persons who exhibit these or other signs of communicable disease as outlined by local health authorities in the presence of a specific disease alert.


Thank you for reading!

Christie Camizzi, RN




Wednesday, October 9, 2019



Welcome to the 2019-20 Robinson Wellness E-News! 

You can check here for all school health and wellness committee activities, 
announcements and updates!    ~Christie Camizzi, BSN, RN



Contents:

1. Germ Control
2. Staying Home During Illness
3. Childhood Obesity



************New & Events***********


Germ Control!!
Happy Fall, Razorbacks!  Just a reminder that it is a great idea to have your child immunized against the flu virus. Once simple vaccine goes a long way to help keep your child healthy throughout the fall and winter months.  Also, remind your child at home to wash hands frequently and I will also reinforce those habits here at school.  We can't keep all illness away from school but we can all do our part to minimize the impact germs make on our student population as a whole. 



Staying Home During Illness
I know that students and parents feel a lot of pressure to keep their kids at school due to class demands and work schedules; however, remember the Plano ISD policies about keeping your student at home.  Following these guidelines protects ALL staff and students.  This includes:

a)Temperature of 100 ° or more. Student must be fever free for 24 hours, without medication, before re-entry
b) Pain and/or swelling at angle of jaw
c) Undetermined rash over any part of the body
d) Undiagnosed scaly patches on the body or scalp
e) Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. Student must be symptom free for 24 hours, without medication, before re-entry
f) Red, draining eyes
g) Intense itching with signs and symptoms of secondary infection
h) Open draining lesions that cannot be covered and contained
i) Jaundice
j) Persons who exhibit these or other signs of communicable disease as outlined by local health authorities in the presence of a specific disease alert.



Childhood Obesity 
Written by Andjelka Pavlovic, PhD


Childhood obesity continues to be one of the greatest health threats to kids and teens across the country. In the United States, approximately 1 in 5 youth ages 6 – 19 is obese, according to a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
One of the leading causes of childhood obesity is a sedentary lifestyle devoid of physical activity. While technological advancements make our lives more comfortable, they also encourage less physical activity and promote more screen time with TVs, tablets and computers. Too much screen time can be detrimental to the overall physical health and emotional well-being of our youth.
Along with physical inactivity, poor diets are also strongly associated with childhood obesity rates. High-calorie, nutrient-deficient meals and snacks and an abundance of drinks loaded with added sugar are causing our youth to pack on the pounds. An unhealthy body mass index and poor cardiorespiratory fitness is a recipe for health risks that can lead to serious problems as adults.
It’s a fact: Obese children are at greater risk of becoming obese adults.
Obesity at any age is a problem. As adults though, it can lead to the development of numerous chronic and potentially life-shortening health conditions such as Type II Diabetes, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer, to name a few. Identifying modifiable risk factors for the prevention of childhood obesity is of utmost importance.

Listen to Mom

Research shows that mothers are the dominant influencers of a child’s lifestyle choices. One recent study sought to examine the relationship between mothers’ lifestyle factors (e.g. healthy body mass index, participation in regular physical activity, smoking status, etc.) and their child’s risk of developing obesity. Approximately 17,000 mothers and 24,000 children participated in the study, which showed that the incidence of obesity in the child was significantly lower when mothers:
  • maintained a healthy body mass index of 18.5-24.9 kg/m2 (56% reduction in risk)
  • engaged in at least 150 min/week of moderate/vigorous physical activities (21% reduction in risk)
  • did not smoke (31% reduction in risk)
  • consumed alcohol in moderation (1.0-14.9 g/day; 12% reduction in risk)
Surprisingly, the one risk factor that was not associated with obesity in children was the mother’s diet. However, children of women who followed all five healthy lifestyle factors (diet, weight, physical activity, smoking, alcohol) had a 75% lower risk of obesity compared to the children of mothers who did not adhere to any healthy lifestyle factors. Additionally, if both mothers and children followed a healthy lifestyle, there was an 82% reduction in the risk of developing obesity.
The study concluded that mothers who adhere to a healthy lifestyle can significantly reduce the risk of obesity in their children. Additionally, when both mothers and children follow a healthy lifestyle, the risk of obesity in children is reduced even further.

Parents Hold the Power

So what does all of this mean? As parents, it is important to establish healthy lifestyle choices in the home to help prevent childhood obesity in the first place:
  • Live a physically active life through exercise, chores, and movement throughout the day.
  • Maintain a healthy body weight.
  • Do not smoke or vape tobacco products.
  • Drink alcohol only in moderation.
  • Eat a healthy, nutrient-rich diet.
Sources:


Thursday, August 1, 2019


Welcome to the 2019-20 Robinson Wellness E-News! 

You can check here for all school health and wellness committee activities, 
announcements and updates!    ~Christie Camizzi, BSN, RN

  
Contents:

1. First Day of School August 12!!
2. Medication Drop Off and Forms
3. Vaccination Updates

Coming Soon: Wellness Committee Updates and Plant-Based Eating!

New & Events

First Day of School is August 12
Welcome back!  Time to hustle and get those vaccines updated and forms into the clinic so your child can attend school on the first day!  If your child's schedule cannot be printed due to a vaccine schedule hold, call me and I can tell you exactly what your child needs and then I will remove the hold.  You can call me at 469-752-6209 and I will call you back quickly.  I do not yet have access to the clinic due to construction but I do receive messages.  Students may NOT attend school without an up to date record.  Parents will be called to pick up their student and we really don't want to do that but it is Texas State Law!  

Medication Drop Off and Forms
Feel free to bring any medications by July 31, August 1, 7, 8, and 9th.  I will be at off campus training on August 5 and 6th.  Avoid the first day of school if possible.  I will very likely have a line out the door.  You may find the Medication Authorization Form here: https://www.pisd.edu/Page/1697

Vaccination Opportunity
If your child needs vaccines, make your doctor appointments as soon as possible.  For a low cost option, on Monday, August 5th, Frankford Middle School is having a Back to School Fair and Passport Health will hold an immunization clinic between 9 AM and 2 PM.  All vaccines are $10!!! Bring me or send via email your updated records to the clinic or christie.camizzi@pisd.edu.  Thank you!

I'd love to meet you and learn more about your child especially if you have any specific health concerns that I can help with while he/she is at school!  
Come by and say "hi"!




Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Robinson's Wellness E-News



Welcome to Robinson's Wellness E-News! 

You can check here for all school health and wellness committee activities, 
announcements and updates! 
Sincerely, Christie Camizzi, BSN, RN
Contents:
1. Schedule Pick Up and Med Drop Off for Fall
2. Links to Action Plans Forms and Medication Forms
3. Sixth Grade Needs Vaccines Before May 22nd!
4. End of Year Medication Pick-Up!!

New & Events

Fall Schedule Pick Up, Med Drop Off and Meeting with the Nurse

Please bring your student’s action plan, medication, and all related supplies to the Robinson Middle School clinic during Schedule Pick-Up on Wednesday, July 31st  from 8-10 AM for 6th grade; 1-3 PM for 7th and 8th grade. Please contact Nurse Christie Camizzi at christie.camizzi@pisd.edu or by phone at 469-752-6209 at your earliest convenience to schedule an appointment time to discuss your child's health issue and receive medication(s). This will facilitate having all the supplies and paperwork in order before the start of school. Looking forward to meeting you!

                                                 Forms for Next Year!

Be ready for next year before your child's Schedule Pick Up Day and bring all forms to the Clinic! You received these forms when picking up your students medications but they are also available via the following links:

            https://www.pisd.edu/Medication Consent Form
            https://www.pisd.edu/Allergy Action Plan
            https://www.pisd.edu/AsthmaActionPlan

            https://www.pisd.edu/DiabetesActionPlan
            https://www.pisd.edu/Seizure Action Plan
            https://www.pisd.edu/Consent Form


Current Sixth Grade Families-DTaP and Meningitis (MCV4) Before End of School Year!

The DPT is required prior to entry to grade 7.   Most sixth graders had their last DPT vaccine at about age 4 or 5 and are due for a booster anyway.  The MCV4 vaccine must also be given prior to starting 7th grade but NOT before 11 years old.  If the MCV4 was given before age 11 years, they will have to have it again before the start of 7th grade.  These are state requirements and will apply no matter what middle school your child attends.  If your student does get these vaccines before the end of the 6th grade year, please provide a copy of the updated immunization record to the school nurse when it becomes available.  The sooner you provide an updated immunization record to the school, the sooner you can put that requirement behind you.  

Please understand: your student will not be given a schedule or be permitted to start grade 7 until the vaccine requirements are met.




                                     END OF YEAR MEDICATION PICK UP!! 

Medications taken on an "as-needed" basis must be picked up from the clinic by Wednesday, May 22.  All daily medications must be picked up by the last day of school on May 24th. All medications are disposed at the end of the last day and are NOT SAVED for the next school year so please pick them up.  Thank you!! 





                                      Have a GRRRREATTT Summer!!


Friday, May 3, 2019

Robinson's Wellness E-News


Welcome to Robinson's Wellness E-News! 

You can check here for all school health and wellness committee activities, 
announcements and updates! 
Sincerely, Christie Camizzi, BSN, RN
Contents:
1. Sixth Grade Needs Vaccines Before May 22nd!
2. Red Balloon Run May 11
3. End of Year Medication Pick-Up!!
4. Links to Action Plans Forms and Medication Forms
5. Healthy Zone School Summer Activities and Info

New & Events

Current Sixth Grade Families-DTaP and Meningitis (MCV4) Before End of School Year!

The DPT is required prior to entry to grade 7.   Most sixth graders had their last DPT vaccine at about age 4 or 5 and are due for a booster anyway.  The MCV4 vaccine must also be given prior to starting 7th grade but NOT before 11 years old.  If the MCV4 was given before age 11 years, they will have to have it again before the start of 7th grade.  These are state requirements and will apply no matter what middle school your child attends.  If your student does get these vaccines before the end of the 6th grade year, please provide a copy of the updated immunization record to the school nurse when it becomes available.  The sooner you provide an updated immunization record to the school, the sooner you can put that requirement behind you.  

Please understand: your student will not be given a schedule or be permitted to start grade 7 until the vaccine requirements are met.

The Red Balloon Run and Ride is May 11, 2019!
Come walk or ride your bike with students, staff and families!  Dress for comfort and wear your PURPLE!  Make it as fun as you'd like!  We've seen tutu's and face paint!  Last year it was cancelled which is likely why they moved it to May this year instead of April.



END OF YEAR MEDICATION PICK UP!! 
Medications taken on an "as-needed" basis must be picked up from the clinic by Wednesday, May 22.  All daily medications must be picked up by the last day of school on May 24th. All medications are disposed at the end of the last day and are NOT SAVED for the next school year so please pick them up.  Thank you!! 


Forms for Next Year!
Be ready for next year before your child's Schedule PickUp Day and bring all forms to the Clinic! All of these forms are available in the clinic or via the following links:
https://www.pisd.edu/Medication Consent Form
https://www.pisd.edu/Allergy Action Plan
https://www.pisd.edu/AsthmaActionPlan

https://www.pisd.edu/DiabetesActionPlan
https://www.pisd.edu/Seizure Action Plan
https://www.pisd.edu/Consent Form

Healthy Zone Summer Activities and Info


Check out these fun and informative resources for healthy summer fun!

https://www.healthyzoneschool.com/resources



Have a GRRRREATTT Summer!!